Style Guide


1a All Grain – British Bitter  SG 1.040 to 1.060

Aroma: Hop aroma can range from moderate to none.
Diacetyl and caramel aromas also moderate to none. Should have a mild to
moderate fruitiness. Some malt aroma should be evident.

Appearance: Medium gold to brown. May have very little
head due to low carbonation.

Flavour: Medium to high bitterness. May or may not
have hop flavour, diacetyl and fruitiness. Balance varies from even to
decidedly bitter, although the bitterness should not completely overpower the
malt flavour.

Mouth feel: Light to medium-light body. Carbonation
low, bottled examples can have moderate carbonation.

2a All Grain Lager- Pils/Pilsner SG 1.044 to 1.050

Aroma: Typically features a light grainy malt character (sometimes Graham cracker-like) and distinctive flowery or spicy noble hops. Clean, no fruity esters, no diacetyl. May have an
initial sulfury aroma (from water and/or yeast) and a low background note of DMS (from pils malt)

Appearance: Straw to light gold, brilliant to very clear, with a creamy, long-lasting white head.

Flavor: Crisp and bitter,with a dry to medium-dry finish. Moderate to moderately-low yet well attenuated maltiness, although some grainy flavors and slight malt sweetness are acceptable. Hop bitterness dominates taste and continues through the finish and lingers into the aftertaste. Hop flavor can range from low to high but should only be derived from German noble hops. Clean, no fruity esters, no diacetyl.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light body, medium to high carbonation.

3a All Grain – Pale Ale/ESB SG 1.040 to SG 1.065

Aroma: Hop aroma high to none. Diacetyl and
caramel aroma moderate to none. Moderate fruitiness. Malt aroma apparent.

Appearance: Golden to dark amber-brown. May have very
little head.

Flavour: Malt flavours evident. Crystal malt flavour
common. Hop flavour ranges from moderate to strong. Diacetyl and fruitiness
moderate to none. Balance varies from even to quite bitter, although malt
flavour should not be completely overpowered.

Mouth feel: Medium to medium-full body. Carbonation
low, although bottled pale ales tend to have moderate carbonation. Warming from
alcohol may be noticeable, but should not be strong.

4a All Grain – Indian Pale Ale SG 1.050 to SG 1.060

Aroma: A moderate to moderately high hop aroma of
floral, earthy or fruity nature is typical, although the intensity of hop
character is usually lower than American Pale Ales.

Appearance: Color ranges from golden amber to light copper, but most are pale to medium amber
with an orange-ish tint. Good head stand should persist.

Flavor: Hop flavor is medium to high, with a moderate to assertive hop bitterness. The hop flavor should be similar to the aroma (floral, earthy, fruity, and/or slightly grassy). Malt flavor should be
medium-low to medium-high, but should be noticeable, pleasant, and support the hop aspect, and a Creamy Taste.

Mouthfeel: Smooth, medium-light to medium-bodied mouthfeel without hop-derived astringency, although moderate to medium-high carbonation can combine to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness. Some smooth alcohol warming can and should be sensed in
stronger (but not all) versions.

5a All Grain – American Pale Ale to SG 1.060

Aroma: Usually moderate to strong hop aroma from
dry hopping or late copper additions of American hop varieties. Citrusy hop
aroma very common. Esters vary from low to high. Diacetyl moderate to none.

Appearance: Golden to amber.

Flavour: Often moderate to high hop flavour. Citrusy
hop flavour very common (such as from Cascades), but also other American hop
variety flavours are found. Malt flavour moderate relative to aggressive hop
flavour and bitterness. Balance towards bitterness. Diacetyl moderate to none.

Mouth feel: Many are rather light, refreshing and more
highly carbonated than many other styles, but body can reach medium.
Carbonation borders on effervescent in some examples.

6a Ales All Grain – Double IPA SG 1.065 to 1.085

Overall Impression: An intensely hoppy, fairly strong pale ale without the big,
rich, complex maltiness and residual sweetness and body of an American
barleywine. Strongly hopped, but clean, dry, and lacking harshness.
Drinkability is an important characteristic; this should not be a heavy,
sipping beer.

Aroma: A prominent to intense hop aroma that typically showcases American or New World hop characteristics (citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, melon, etc.). Most versions are dry hopped and can have an additional resinous or grassy aroma, although this is not absolutely required. Some clean malty sweetness may be found in the background. Fruitiness, either from esters or hops, may also be detected in some versions, although a neutral fermentation character is typical. Some alcohol can usually be noted, but it should not have a “hot” character.

Appearance:
Color ranges from golden to light orangecopper; most modern versions are fairly
pale. Good clarity, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions may be a bit hazy.
Moderate-sized, persistent, white to off-white head.

Flavor: Hop flavor is strong and complex, and can reflect the characteristics of modern
American or New World hop varieties (citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy,
tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, melon, etc.). High to absurdly high hop
bitterness. Low to medium malt flavor, generally clean and grainy-malty
although low levels of caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Low to medium
fruitiness is acceptable but not required. A long, lingering bitterness is
usually present in the aftertaste but should not be harsh. Dry to medium-dry
finish; should not finish sweet or heavy. A light, clean, smooth alcohol flavor
is not a fault. Oak is inappropriate in this style. May be slightly sulfury, but
most examples do not exhibit this character.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body,
with a smooth texture. Medium to medium-high carbonation. No harsh hop derived
astringency. Restrained, smooth alcohol warming acceptable

7a Ales All Grain – Dark Mild SG 1.030to 1.040

Aroma: Low to moderate malt aroma, and may have
some fruitiness. The malt expression can take on a wide range of character,
which can include caramelly, grainy, toasted, nutty, chocolate, or lightly
roasted. Little to no hop aroma. Very low to no diacetyl.

Appearance: Copper to dark brown or mahogany color. A
few paler examples (medium amber to light brown) exist. Generally clear,
although is traditionally unfiltered. Flavor: Generally a malty beer,
although may have a very wide range of malt- and yeast-based flavors (e.g.,
malty, sweet, caramel, toffee, toast, nutty, chocolate, coffee, roast, vinous,
fruit, licorice, molasses, plum, raisin). Can finish sweet or dry. Diacetyl and
hop flavor low to none.

Mouthfeel: Light to medium body. Generally low to medium-low carbonation. Roast-based versions may have a light astringency. Sweeter versions may seem to have a rather full mouthfeel for the gravity.

8a Ales All Grain Porter SG 1.040 to 1.052

Aroma: Malt aroma with mild roastiness should be evident, and may have a chocolaty quality. May also show some non-roasted malt character in support (caramelly, grainy, bready, nutty, toffee-like and/or
sweet). English hop aroma moderate to none. Fruity esters moderate to none.
Diacetyl low to none.

Appearance: Light brown to dark brown
in color, often with ruby highlights when held up to light. Good clarity,
although may approach being opaque. Moderate off-white to light tan head with
good to fair retention.

Flavour: Malt flavor includes a mild to moderate roastiness (frequently with a chocolate character) and often a significant caramel, nutty, and/or toffee character. May have other secondary flavors such
as coffee, licorice, biscuits or toast in support. Should not have a significant black malt character (acrid, burnt, or harsh roasted flavors), although small amounts may contribute a bitter chocolate complexity. English hop flavor moderate to none. Medium-low to medium hop bitterness will vary the
balance from slightly malty to slightly bitter. Usually fairly well attenuated, although somewhat sweet versions exist. Diacetyl should be moderately low to none. Moderate to low fruity esters.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Moderately low
to moderately high carbonation.

9a Ales All Grain – Stout SG 1.044 to SG 1.055

This category contains average to strong, bitter to sweet, modern British and Irish stouts that originated in England even if some are now more widely associated with Ireland. In this case, “British” means the broader British Isles not Great Britain.

Aroma: Malt aroma with mild roast notes should be
evident. Hop aroma may be moderate to low. Aroma: Coffee-like roasted barley
and roasted malt aromas are prominent. Esters low to medium. Diacetyl moderate
to none. Hop aroma low to none.

Appearance: Deep garnet to black in colour. Clarity is irrelevant in such a dark beer. A thick, creamy,
long-lasting head is characteristic.

Flavour: Moderate acidity/sourness and sharpness from roasted grains, and medium to high hop bitterness, provide a dry finish.
Balancing factors may include some creaminess, moderate to low fruitiness, and medium to no Diacetyl.

Mouth feel: Medium-light to medium body, with a creamy character. Low to moderate carbonation.

10a All Grain – Wheat Beer SG 1.040 to 1.060

Overall Impression: A pale, refreshing German or American wheat beer with high carbonation, dry finish, a fluffy mouthfeel, and can have a distinctive banana-and-clove yeast character

Aroma: Moderate to strong phenols (usually clove) and fruity esters (typically banana). The balance and intensity of the phenol and ester components can vary but the best examples are reasonably balanced and fairly prominent. The hop character ranges from low to none. A light to moderate wheat aroma (which might be perceived as bready or grainy) may be present but other malt characteristics should not. Optional, but acceptable, aromatics can include a light to moderate vanilla character, and/or a faint bubblegum aroma. None of these optional characteristics should be high or dominant, but often can add to the complexity and balance.

Flavor: Low to moderately strong banana and clove flavor. The balance and intensity of the phenol and ester components can vary but the best examples are reasonably balanced and fairly prominent. Optionally, a very light to moderate vanilla character and/or faint bubblegum notes can accentuate the banana flavor, sweetness and roundness; neither should be dominant if present. The soft, somewhat bready or grainy flavor of wheat is complementary, as is a slightly grainy-sweet malt character. Hop flavor is very low to none, and hop bitterness is very low to moderately low. Well-rounded, flavorful palate with a relatively dry finish. The perception of sweetness is more due to the absence of hop bitterness than actual residual sweetness; a sweet or heavy finish would significantly impair drinkability.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body; never heavy. Suspended yeast may increase the perception of body. The texture of wheat imparts the sensation of a fluffy, creamy fullness that may progress to a light, spritzy finish aided by high to very high carbonation. Always effervescent.

11a  European Ale (Saison,Bier de Garde,Blond,Tripel,Quadrupel) SG 1.048 – 1.065

Aroma: High fruitiness with low to moderate hop
aroma and moderate to no herb, spice and alcohol aroma. Fruity esters dominate
the aroma and are often reminiscent of citrus fruits such as oranges or lemons.
A low to medium-high spicy or floral hop aroma is usually present. A moderate
spice aroma (from actual spice additions and/or yeast-derived phenols)
complements the other aromatics. When phenolics are present they tend to be
peppery rather than clove-like. A low to moderate sourness or acidity may be present,
but should not overwhelm other characteristics. Spice, hop and sour aromatics
typically increase with the strength of the beer. Alcohols are soft, spicy and
low in intensity, and should not be hot or solventy. The malt character is
light. No diacetyl.

Appearance: Often a distinctive pale orange but may be golden or amber in color. There is no correlation between strength and color. Long-lasting, dense, rocky white to ivory head resulting in characteristic “Belgian lace” on the glass as it fades. Clarity is poor to good though haze is not unexpected in this type of unfiltered farmhouse beer. Effervescent.

Flavor: Combination of fruity and spicy flavors supported by a soft malt character, a low to moderate alcohol presence and tart sourness. Extremely high attenuation gives a characteristic dry finish. The fruitiness is frequently citrusy (orange- or lemon-like). The addition of one of more spices serve to add complexity, but shouldn’t dominate in the balance. Low peppery yeast-derived phenols may be present instead of or in addition to spice additions; phenols tend to be lower than in many other Belgian beers, and complement the bitterness. Hop flavor is low to moderate, and is generally spicy or earthy in character. Hop bitterness may be moderate to high, but should not overwhelm fruity esters, spices, and malt. Malt character is light but provides a sufficient background for the other flavors. A low to moderate tart sourness may be present, but should not overwhelm other flavors. Spices, hop bitterness and flavor, and sourness commonly increase with the strength of the beer while sweetness decreases. No hot alcohol or solventy character. High carbonation, moderately sulfate water, and high attenuation give a very dry finish with a long, bitter, sometimes spicy aftertaste. The perceived bitterness is often higher than the IBU level would suggest. No diacetyl.

Mouthfeel:Light to medium body. Alcohol level can be medium to medium-high, though the
warming character is low to medium. No hot alcohol or solventy character. Very
high carbonation with an effervescent quality. There is enough prickly acidity
on the tongue to balance the very dry finish. A low to moderate tart character
may be present but should be refreshing and not to the point of puckering.

12a Kits Out of the Can only (These can be 1 or 2 can kits)

Each beer will be judged on its merits. When entering the beer, the labels shall have an
additional field that will state the intended style.

13a Wine – Country, Kit, cordial or juice wines (Red)

Each wine will be judged on its merits. When entering the wine, the labels shall have an
additional field that will state the intended style.

14a Wine – Country, Kit, cordial or juice wines (White/Amber)

Each wine will be judged on its merits. When entering the wine, the labels shall have an
additional field that will state the intended style.

15a Wine – Country, Kit, cordial or juice wines (Rose/Blush)

Each wine will be judged on its merits. When entering the wine, the labels shall have an
additional field that will state the intended style.

16a Cider – The main ingredient must be apple juice.

All styles accepted sweet/medium/dry, still or sparkling. Each cider will be judged on its
merits When entering a Cider the label shall have an additional field to state
the intended style.

17a Mead -Sweet, Semi- Sweet,Dry,
Fruit, Cyser, Pyment

Each Mead will be judged on its merits. When entering the Mead, the labels shall have an
additional field that will state the intended style.

Aroma: Hop aroma can range from moderate to none.
Diacetyl and caramel aromas also moderate to none. Should have a mild to
moderate fruitiness. Some malt aroma should be evident.

Appearance: Medium gold to brown. May have very little head due to low carbonation.

Flavour: Medium to high bitterness. May or may not have hop flavour, diacetyl and fruitiness. Balance varies from even to
decidedly bitter, although the bitterness should not completely overpower the
malt flavour.

Mouth feel: Light to medium-light body. Carbonation low, bottled examples can have moderate carbonation.